Of course you know her…PhoebeNewYork

Libby Schoettle was born in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. She currently lives and works in New York City, where her artwork takes the form of original collages, photographs, drawings, and street art, as well as a small run of limited edition prints (and custom prints that are available upon request).

Libby’s art centers on the character “PhoebeNewYork.” PhoebeNewYork is the artist’s alter ego, and reflects Libby’s own emotions and perceptions.

PhoebeNewYorkPhoebe first came to life in collages created with found objects including vintage clothes, book covers and photos, line drawings and photographs. Her Instagram followers seek out Phoebe for her dark and funny explorations into love and relationships, as seen here.

More recently, Phoebe has ventured onto the streets. There, she changes dynamic cityscapes in intriguing and ephemeral ways…offering a message of understanding to passersby who might at that moment feel lonely, dejected, isolated or even hopeful about the possibility of love and acceptance. Phoebe-on-the-street is fresh and feminine and aims to evoke emotion and forge connections among people, including the artist herself. See some of Libby’s street art here.

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Together, Libby and Phoebe are the subjects of a modern-style docuseries that will provide a one-of-a-kind perspective on the quintessential artist’s experience. The docuseries is being produced by Canobie Films and is scheduled for release in winter, 2017.

Libby is also an aspiring author; she’s currently writing her first memoir-based novel depicting her life as an artist.

Muhammad Ali by Gordon Parks

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Vintage photograph by Gordon Parks, Muhammad Ali, 1966 at Miami (8 x 10 inches)

Gordon Parks (November 30, 1912 – March 7, 2006) was an American photographer, musician, writer and film director, who became prominent in U.S. documentary photojournalism in the 1940s through 1970s—particularly in issues of civil rights, poverty and African-Americans—and in glamour photography. As the first famous pioneer among black filmmakers, he was the first African-American to produce and direct major motion pictures—developing films relating the experience of slaves and struggling black Americans, and creating the “blaxploitation” genre. He is best remembered for his iconic photos of poor Americans during the 1940s (taken for a federal government project), for his photographic essays for Life magazine, and as the director of the 1971 film Shaft. Parks also was an author, poet and composer.

Irving Penn

Irving Penn (June 16, 1917 – October 7, 2009) was an American photographer known for his fashion photography, portraits, and still lifes. Penn’s career included work at Vogue magazine, and independent advertising work for clients including Issey Miyake and Clinique. His work has been exhibited internationally and continues to inform the art of photography.

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Dahomey Children, 1967
Platinum print, 34.9 x 34.6 cm

Todd WEBB: The Forgotten Master of 1940s NYC Street Photography…

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Photograph by Todd WEBB,
Gelatin silver, printed later
HARLEM, 1946
14 x 11 inches

Todd Webb (September 5, 1905 – April 15, 2000) was an American photographer notable for documenting everyday life and architecture in cities such as New York, Paris as well as from the American west. His photography has been compared with Harry Callahan, Berenice Abbott, Walker Evans, and the French photographer Eugène Atget. He traveled extensively during his long life and had important friendships with artists such as Georgia O’Keeffe, Ansel Adams and Harry Callahan. He photographed famous people including Dorothea Lange. His life was like his photos in the sense of being seemingly simple, straightforward, but revealing complexity and depth upon a closer examination. Capturing history, his pictures often transcend the boundary between photography and artistic expression.

PHOTO FOR SALE

(Ref: TWEBB) – Price on request, please enter your email:

Josephine Baker by Emil Bieber

Surely the day will come when color means nothing more than the skin tone, when religion is seen uniquely as a way to speak one’s soul, when birth places have the weight of a throw of the dice and all men are born free, when understanding breeds love and brotherhood. “- Josephine Baker

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Vintage photograph of Josephine Baker
photographed by Emil Bieber in 1920s
Size: 9′ 1/4 x 7′

(Ref: Baker/Bieber) – Price on request, please enter your email:

Andy Warhol and Horst P. Horst

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The photographer HORST serving up ANDY WARHOL in the 1980’s. Warhol in his panelled boardroom at the FACTORY serving cold cuts at his Irish Regency sideboard. A beautiful Pre-Raphaelite painting by Scottish David Forrester Wilson. The infamous Factory was an 1870’s warehouse housing Wahol’s work, the offices of his magazine INTERVIEW and his collection of antiques. (note the great dane Cecil)

Photo for sale:

KALOMA…“I Married Wyatt Earp”

Rare original photo titled “Kaloma” that was widely circulated and a very famous early erotic image. This photo was used in the book “I Married Wyatt Earp” the recollections of Josephine Earp. There is much debate weather or not the image is really the wife of Earp or not. Still a very historic and one of the most famous early images of it’s type.

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Kaloma

 

 

coverThe 1976 book I Married Wyatt Earp was believed to be a memoir of his widow Josephine Earp, but was many years later described as a fraud, creative exercise, and a hoax. Originally published by the respected University of Arizona Press, it is the second best-selling book about western Deputy U.S. Marshal Wyatt Earp ever sold. It was regarded for many years as a factual account that shed considerable light on the life of Wyatt Earp and his brothers in Tombstone, Arizona Territory. It was cited in scholarly works, assigned as classroom work, and used as a source by filmmakers. Amateur Earp historian Glenn Boyer said that the retouched image on the cover of a scantily-clad woman was of Josephine in her 20s, and based on his statements, copies of the image were later sold at auction for up to $2,875.

Boyer had a long-term relationship with members of the Earp family. He claimed that he used two manuscripts written by Josephine Earp as the basis for the memoir. The first was an account, allegedly composed by Josephine with the help of former Tombstone Mayor and The Tombstone Epitaph publisher John Clum, known as the “Clum manuscript”. The second, supposedly written by Josephine with the assistance of two Earp cousins, was known as the “Cason manuscript”. Josephine fiercely protected details of her and Wyatt’s early life in Tombstone, including her own life there and the existence of Wyatt Earp’s second wife, Mattie Blaylock, even threatening litigation to keep some details private. Josephine was repeatedly vague about her and Wyatt’s time in Arizona, so much so that the Earp cousins gave up collaborating with her and publishers refused to publish the manuscript.

In 1994, other Western researchers and rival authors of new Earp books identified alleged discrepancies in the book and began to challenge the authenticity of what they called the “Clum manuscript”. They also claimed to have identified factual errors and inconsistencies in other books published by Boyer, leading to an increasing number of questions about the veracity of his work. The risque cover image was linked to a photogravure titled Kaloma that had been first published by a novelty company in 1914. A 1998 investigative article in the Phoenix New Times revealed that Boyer could not prove the Clum manuscript existed and refused to allow the reporter access to the source documentation. The article also disclosed that the university press’ editor encouraged Boyer to embellish the account. During the interview, Boyer said that he had a responsibility to protect the reputation of the Earp brothers, and that he “had a license to say any darned thing I please…[to] lie, cheat, and steal.” Boyer found another publisher and continued to publish the work, representing it as an authentic history of Wyatt Earp’s life.

Malick Sidibé, the Sixties in Bamako….

Malick Sidibé (born 1935 or 1936) is a Malian photographer noted for his black-and-white studies of popular culture in the 1960s in Bamako.

Sidibé was born in Bamako, Mali. He was a peasant child who raised animals. From the age of five or six he began herding animals and working the land.

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When the time came he was chosen to be sent to the white school for an education. During his first year he became interested in art and by high school he was doing drawings for official events. The Major admired his talent and selected him to go to the School of Sudanese Craftsmen in the capital Bamako.

It was at this school where Sidibé was approached by a photographer and learned the skills which he would pursue for the rest of his life.

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1839…The DAGUERREOTYPE

The daguerreotype (French: daguerréotype) process, or daguerreotypy, was the first publicly announced photographic process, and for nearly twenty years, it was the one most commonly used. It was invented by Louis-Jaques-Mandé Daguerre and introduced worldwide in 1839. By 1860, new processes which were less expensive and produced more easily viewed images had almost completely replaced it. During the past few decades, there has been a small-scale revival of daguerreotypy among photographers interested in making artistic use of early photographic processes.

758aee112b0adc7af39d3802b51d8829To make a daguerreotype, the daguerreotypist polished a sheet of silver-plated copper to a mirror finish; treated it with fumes that made its surface light-sensitive; exposed it in a camera for as long as was judged to be necessary, which could be as little as a few seconds for brightly sunlit subjects or much longer with less intense lighting; made the resulting latent image on it visible by fuming it with mercury vapor; removed its sensitivity to light by liquid chemical treatment; rinsed and dried it; then sealed the easily marred result behind glass in a protective enclosure.

Viewing a daguerreotype is unlike looking at any other type of photograph. The image does not sit on the surface of the metal, but appears to be floating in space, and the illusion of reality, especially with examples that are sharp and well exposed is unique to the process.

hb_2001.756The image is on a mirror-like silver surface, normally kept under glass, and will appear either positive or negative, depending on the angle at which it is viewed, how it is lit and whether a light or dark background is being reflected in the metal.

The darkest areas of the image are simply bare silver; lighter areas have a microscopically fine light-scattering texture. The surface is very delicate, and even the lightest wiping can permanently scuff it. Some tarnish around the edges is normal, and any treatment to remove it should be done only by a specialized restorer.

Several types of antique photographs, most often ambrotypes and tintypes, but sometimes even old prints on paper, are very commonly misidentified as daguerreotypes, especially if they are in the small, ornamented cases in which daguerreotypes made in the US and UK were usually housed. The name “daguerreotype” correctly refers only to one very specific image type and medium, the product of a process that was in wide use only from the early 1840s to the late 1850s.


Louis Daguerre