László Moholy-Nagy… The photographer who painted with light

Moholy Nagy
Untitled photogram from the Lászlo Moholy-Nagy (8½x11¾”) – 1940s
Moholy Nagy1
Monoskop – Lászlo Moholy-Nagy (8½x11¾”) – 1940s

Among the early twentieth-century’s avant-garde, Hungarian-born photographer László Moholy-Nagy (1895-1946) was one of the most ardent seekers of the “New Vision.” His preoccupation with the phenomenon of light was a defining influence on every period of his work, and one of his great strengths lay in his effortless skill in translating light and spatial dimensions from one medium to another. By the time the first color photographic processes became widely available in the early 1930s, he had mastered black-and-white, and he turned immediately this next big thing. Color proved to be one of his most important media, not only during his early years in Germany, but also as he reestablished himself at the New Bauhaus and the Institute of Design, both of which he initiated upon moving to the United States and settling in Chicago. Until now, with only a few exceptions, his work in color has been unknown. Moholy-Nagy made his first experiments with the medium between 1934 and his death in 1946.

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